Winter Vehicle Preparation

 

Winter Vehicle Preparation

 
Winter weather is hard on your vehicle and its engine. Here are some tips to help you make sure your ride is up to the challenge:
 
 
1) Install winter tires. Use four matched winter tires that carry the mountain/snowflake winter tire symbol and with tread no less than 3.5 mm – even when driving a 4 X 4 vehicle.
Tires marked with an M+S (Mud and Snow) are also legally acceptable but do not provide the same degree of performance as a mountain snowflake tire in severe winter conditions.
Winter tires improve driving safety by providing better traction in snow, slush and icy conditions. Check for wear before installing the tires and check tire air pressure frequently, as it decreases in cold weather.
 
2) Get your car winter ready with a maintenance check up. Preventative maintenance is key. Make sure your battery, brakes, lights and fuses, cooling and heating systems, electrical and exhaust systems, and belts and hoses are in tip-top shape.
 
3) Change your wiper blades to winter blades. They are heavier and push snow and ice more easily.
 
4) Clear snow and ice from all windows, lights, mirrors, hood and the roof. After starting your vehicle, wait for the window to defrost completely to allow clear visibility all around.
 
5) If you have a cell phone, make sure it’s charged and bring it with you. A car charger for the phone is a smart device to have on hand. Cell phone batteries can freeze in very cold weather. Don’t leave your phone in the car for extended periods of time.
 
6) Make sure your windshield washer reservoir is full, and carry extra washer fluid in your vehicle.
 
7) Keep your gas tank topped up. This will help to avoid condensation and moist air inside the tank, which can cause fuel lines to freeze and other serious issues.
 
8) If you get stuck in a storm, don’t panic. Avoid overexertion and exposure. Stay in your vehicle and open your window slightly to make sure you have a supply of fresh air. Use a survival candle for heat. Set out a warning light or flares.


 
 
The Importance of Winter Tires
 
 
Winter, and the associated snow, ice, cold and climatic nastiness that goes with it is now upon us Canadians.
 
 
You know that winter tires will make your ride safer if you're driving in winter. You know that you should probably install a set, because they're a good idea. If you ask someone you know who owns winter tires, they'll tell you they make a big difference for grip, handling, traction and all-around confidence.

Since you know that installing winter tires are an all-around solid idea, the balance of this article won't be your typical preach-piece about putting winter rubber on your ride and what could happen if you don't. Instead, we'll focus on a few key benefits you can expect by installing a set--especially on your newer car, truck or SUV model.


 
Compromise-Free
Winter tires have both a flexible rubber compound and unique tread design that's made exclusively for use on snow, slush and ice and in cold temperatures. With no compromises made for other seasons, drivers will benefit from significantly increased traction during acceleration, notably shorter stopping distances, and a drastic increase in directional stability at speed. Where all-season tires are a little bit good in the heat and a little bit good in the cold, winter tires specialize in cold-climate driving, and it shows. With the compromise-free, cold-climate engineering behind winter tires, drivers can enjoy the cold-weather travel season with peace of mind to spare for themselves, or anyone using their ride.


 
Maximized AWD Performance
All Wheel Drive (AWD) is a favorite bit of powertrain hardware with Canadian shoppers in numerous vehicle types. Today's latest models have more fast-acting, precise and sophisticated all-wheel drive systems than ever before--and whether you drive a Subaru, Ford, Acura Hyundai or Mitsubishi, your ride's AWD system reacts with millisecond precision to low-traction situations to keep you and your family safe by supporting you in maintaining vehicle control.

So, if you've invested in AWD, why not consider maximizing the system's performance with a set of winter rubber? Remember: the only way to increase the amount of physical traction between a vehicle and the road's surface is through the tires. Proper tires for the season gives your AWD system plenty more grip to work with, allowing it to do its job with maximum effectiveness.


 
Not Just for Snow and Ice
Did you know that all-season or summer performance tires get really, really hard when it's cold outside? Since effective traction relies on tires being soft and malleable against the roads surface, hard tires can be a recipe for disaster. In cold weather, even on dry roads, the softer, more flexible rubber used in the construction of winter tires provides that all-important give that all-season tires lose when it's cold out. Translation? Even on dry roads, winter tires work better in the winter.
 
 
 
 
 
Close to Mill Creek Ravine $438,000
 
 
 
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Today’s Bank of Canada rate hold announcement marks almost four straight years that the key benchmark rate has remained unchanged, since September 8, 2010. Great news if you have a variable-rate mortgage or home equity line of credit; the prime rate stays at 3%.

 

The announcement noted that “the risks to the outlook for inflation remain roughly balanced, while the risks associated with household imbalances have not diminished.” With these considerations, the Bank is maintaining its monetary policy stimulus, and remains neutral with respect to the timing and direction of the next change.

 

The next rate-setting day is October 22nd.

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